Tag Archives: shop floor technology

Outlook and Email is not Manufacturing Software

As many manufacturers outgrow their process plan solution, some end up using email to manage their critical production processes.

By Kristin McLane, President of CIMx Software

Do yourself a favor.  Pick a day this week and look at your Outlook Inbox.  How many messages do you get a day?  Do you know how to find that?  If not, here are directions.  How many messages are in your Inbox right now?  How many remain unopened?

3d small people - angry

Relying on email or messaging software will create more production problems than they solve. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

On any given day, I’m receiving several thousand emails.  Over 95% end up in my spam filter.  The other 5% are distributed based on content, some going into automated folders for review later, or directed to the main folder for immediate review.

Without these filters and rules, email can be overwhelming.  Even with my systems and my rigorous controls, problems happen and messages are lost or misplaced.  I can’t rely on Microsoft Outlook to run my business.  Yet, there are manufacturing shop floor systems out there that run your shop floor using the same tools.

We sit right in the middle of our industry – MES and manufacturing software.  We are used in the very largest companies in the world to put rockets into space, huge commercial planes into the air and are with you during critical, invasive hospital procedures.  We’ve worked with soap, wire, carbon fiber and glass.  We’ve completed medical and aerospace audits and we’ve even worked with wood cabinetry.

The largest manufacturers in the world might call on us to implement an enterprise system that connects one or more large-scale facilities into standard processes or even cross-plant performance reporting.  Smaller and mid-size businesses might use us to keep track of orders on their shop floor and tell their customers ship dates for products.  And all the companies in between need us to keep their shop floors working smoothly, productively and with few if any errors.

As these smaller and mid-size businesses try to push their revenues up, they find they’re outgrowing their software tools. The job shop system that ran routings around the floor falls short when they try to expand the product line or customize orders for customers.  So many of these manufacturers look for a quick-fix, and turn to email-based shop floor solutions that use Outlook as a messaging tool to help.  Ouch.

Outlook is not the right tool for this.  Sure, mail has the little red flag to mark something as important and even “read receipt” messaging to make sure that your colleague received the information.  But should you use it as a tool for production?  Hardly.  Email is unresponsive, unhelpful and generally slow in terms of production planning and shop floor work.

When looking for a tool that will help with production and the shop floor, consider this:

  • Email should not, be your primary means of communicating an issue. If the operator or worse, your Quality Engineer, is constantly monitoring their screen for email alerts or notifications that an important message awaits, they do not have their eyes on your actual production – which is bad news.  Our system, similar to many, can send an email when a certain process finishes, a problem arises or someone’s waiting on approvals or a piece of work.  We hope, however, that the email is well-aged by the time the engineer looks at it.
  • Ask the software supplier where and how, specifically, Outlook or messaging of any kind is used within the product. Ask them to describe how important issues are handled and what happens when one team needs to speak to another. You don’t want production delayed while the shop floor waits for someone to read a critical message.  A system without push technology might lead to workers wandering the shop floor rather than running jobs at their work centers.
  • Consider how the system captures messages in the production record. A system using email as a primary means of communication is probably not adding them to the final build record or the record that’s created is simply a string of these communications reported without a connection to the associated work completed.  That can be a problem, especially when you need an accurate production record.

In the end, a quick fix may seem an easy solution, but open you to greater risk and other production problems. Need more help?  Reach out and tell us what you need.  You’ll find that we open every email that gets through the filter, but you’ll probably have more luck, just like your shop floor, in not relying on Outlook for your most critical items.

What Our Software Does

Sometimes, the simplest questions can be the most difficult to answer.

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Not long ago, a prospect asked what we do.

He was looking for a standard MES and paperless manufacturing system. He had been to the website, and read over the material posted there. As he explained, it seemed to be what he was looking for, but he wanted a simple list that spelled out what, exactly, the software was going to do for him.

There is No Easy Answer for MES or MOM Functionality

Answering that question isn’t as easy as you might think. We have customers all over the world, and our software is used by thousands (many thousands) of users each day, and each one needs the software to do something different.

question.

What can MES and Paperless Manufacturing do for you? Image by http://www.colourbox.com

Consider this – for a normal implementation of our software in a single factory, one person might use Quantum to pull up visual work instructions. The plant manager might use it to track production and identify potential bottlenecks. A sales rep uses it to answer questions for a customer and prepare orders. Quality is tracking non-conformances. Engineering is streamlining production on a new product line and working with the shop floor on engineering changes. In another office, an analyst is running reports on past production cycle working on ways to reduce costs and improve cycle time.

Our standard software, a Smart MES or MOM system, will do all that. It provides a digital foundation for manufacturing processes, which means for Medical device manufacturers it might manage labels, electronic validation and compliance with FDA 21 CFR Part 11, and automatically generate Batch Processing Records (BPR) – for a start. Carbon composite manufacturers need to control and synchronize specifications, recipes and process documentation. For an MRO it will coordinate all activities in the maintenance and repair process, while optimizing scheduling and improving communication and collaboration with the customer.

Every industry has slightly different needs, which is why we designed our software to configure so easily between industries. The open, flexible software design makes it easy for manufacturers to implement and use the features they need.

The shop floor technician knows it is where he gets his work instructions and tracks his work for the day. The crib manager uses it for asset management, and IT sees it as an app for operations. Each one answers the question of what the software does slightly different.

What is Paperless Manufacturing?

To be honest, no one is wrong. All see the system as a tool for them to do their job better, faster and with fewer errors. There is nothing wrong with that, but we still want to answer the question. We’re not hiding anything, so here is our answer to that (not so simple) question: Our software will:

  • Author and manage process plans for product models and quantities to meet customer orders.
  • Automatically, or manually through a production control person, attach correct product plans to orders. An ERP integration is used for automatic work flow.
  • Distribute all order work to the correct work center with priority, estimated times, and all specific information such as specifications, measures, tooling, materials and special instructions.
  • Review and manage shop floor order schedules and routings.
  • Collect data on work processes (how the work was done and by whom).
  • Collect data on labor (how long it took to do the work).
  • Collect all quality data on the order (how accurate was the work done).
  • Collect data on scrap and rework. (what problems occurred).
  • Observe trending reports on selected data.
  • Observe Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) on selected data.
  • Track all orders on the shop floor on a dashboard showing progress to the minute.
  • Create automatic reports of product events and order data.
  • Create real time report of all quality issues (a real time dashboard).
  • Create automatic report of the complete, accurate as-built record for all orders.
  • Create report of all serialized parts for accurate traceability in the future.
  • Manage and oversee shop floor machine maintenance schedules and processes.
  • Manage inventory of tooling, materials and parts.
  • Manage a secure data warehouse of all historical, orders, plans and data.
Efficient Manufacturing

Paperless Manufacturing and MES provide digital support to your manufacturing operations. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

So, this is our answer, bereft of the marketing and sales copy.

You can go to MESA for their model of MES. In a few years, I’m sure the model will change yet again, and with good reason. Other software vendors can pick at this list and find holes they can fill with their own glorious functionality. We aren’t trying to challenge the industry with this list, just answer the question of what we do. The needs of manufacturing are constantly changing. New tools, technologies, and market demands are a disruptive influence on our industry, and we need to adjust with them or we fall behind.

In a few months we can go back to our list and see if it has changed, because we are a dynamic company. Our customers need and expect us to continue to innovate. That’s the value we bring to them.

Have a question, or want to see how we can benefit your operation, then contact us today. We’re always happy to help.

Simple Tips for Selecting the Right Manufacturing Software

Don’t get stuck with a software solution that causes more problems than it solves. Learn what you can do to deliver a project that makes a positive impact.

By Kristin McLane, President of CIMx Software

Ever wonder why some companies struggle to move forward with a project, including an MES or paperless manufacturing system, even when there are obvious benefits?

It may not make sense, but it’s (literally) human nature.

 

Select the right MES for you and your shop floor by following a few simple tips. Image by www.colourbox.com

Select the right MES for you and your shop floor by following a few simple tips. Image by http://www.colourbox.com

Confirmation Bias is the tendency of people to selectively remember, interpret and analyze information to confirm existing beliefs. We selectively process information to confirm what we think is true, while ignoring or misinterpreting anything counter to those beliefs. Confirmation Bias is a cognitive issue, an error in inductive reasoning, and a failure in logic and information processing. It could also be what is holding your company back, and keeping you from finding manufacturing success.

Companies come to us with production problems – a failed audit for example, or a critical quality escape. We’ll help them identify the issues behind the problem, then find the solution. Along the way, we’ll discover other shop floor solutions to problems like out-of-control paper records or missed data collections. Despite the benefits, companies are still reluctant to take the next step and make a change. They will twist their processes and operations to cover-up the flaws, throw away money and never really solve the problem.

Often, that’s confirmation bias costing them money. IT wants an easy option that won’t add to their work. In their mind every new system means new work, so they can only see the current system as the best solution. Similarly, many current shop floor users are more than happy with their current processes, so they will only see flaws in other solutions. Management, Quality Control, and others will have a stake in the project, and evaluate each option with their own cognitive bias and flawed inductive reasoning.

Is it any wonder building consensus around a new shop floor system, no matter how effective it might be, requires a herculean effort of titanic proportions?

From our experience, the companies that overcome confirmation bias and find the best solution for their operations will first build internal consensus on potential solutions early in the process. Start out by including all the stakeholders. While the project should focus on the key priorities, also be aware of the priorities for each stakeholder. Many times, a project fails when one group makes a selection based on a single set of priorities, never understanding how it will impact the other stakeholders. Building consensus early will help ensure the project has the greatest positive impact.

Next, develop a focused and manageable set of priorities based on expected ROI. A project will often be derailed by a massive list of requirements. Requirements shouldn’t be a wish list. Identify the 3-5 key items that must be addressed in the system. Other items can then be added in later phases once the system has been installed and the company begins collecting an ROI.

Finally, be prepared to evaluate alternative solutions before making a selection. One easy method for overcoming confirmation bias is to force yourself to consider alternatives before evaluating your preferred solution. Looking at alternatives first will help you objectively evaluate data. Many times, the preferred solution ends up being the best, but by looking at alternatives first you can better evaluate all the options.

Once a solution is chosen, develop benchmarks and a schedule for evaluating the solution. Use the requirement list to determine the benchmarks. Determine if the solution is solving your problem and meeting your needs. If it’s not, make sure you’ve written into the contract how to proceed. Don’t get stuck with software that requires endless service calls or causes more problems than it solves. Find a supplier you can trust to work with you and deliver solutions.

Are you curious to learn more, or see how a simple software solution can significantly improve your bottom line? Then contact us today for a free evaluation of your shop floor.

Are Your Paper-based Travelers Holding Back Your Shop Floor?

Inefficient, annoying, error-prone and wasteful, many times paper-based work travelers are the source of countless shop floor problems and might be holding production back.

 By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Many times, discussions about paperless manufacturing and MES focus on hard data (35% increase in production and a 45% decrease in quality defects – hurray!), the ROI or the global enterprise (real-time shop floor visibility and control, and sustainable process improvement and enforcement – alright!).  We forget to notice the little improvements that have the greatest impact on the shop floor – the things that make everyone’s life easier.  They bring joy, increased job satisfaction and improve the shop floor quality-of-life.  It may not directly impact the ROI, but it sure makes everyone happy.

Exhibit A: The Paperless Shop Traveler
What steps can you take to improve performance (and happiness) on your shop floor?  Illustration by www.colourbox.com

What steps can you take to improve performance (and happiness) on your shop floor? Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

Face it, shop travelers that are a huge bundle of paper, checklists, drawings and data collections can be a major pain.  Those annoying bundles of work instructions and shop floor records that are painstakingly printed every morning, then laboriously assembled and bundled into plastic sleeves, bags, or bound together by pins, clips or whatever is on hand.  It makes its journey across the shop, carried by hand or thrown on a cart.  As changes happen, notes are added, papers removed and measurements made.  It’s dropped, spilled on, and crammed into corners.  Pieces are lost and critical information gets shuffled back and forth with everyone hoping nothing gets missed.  Let’s be honest, all that paper isn’t necessary!

When it’s all done, the records are stored away – those piles and piles (and piles) of records.  Maybe someone has to collect the data scrawled on the traveler, then (re)input the information.  Finally, it’s all shoved into a box and carted away to storage.  If you’re lucky, maybe you have a process that converts it to a pdf.  Maybe.

That’s what happens all too often.  Like I said… it’s annoying, inefficient and error prone.  The paper-based traveler is the source of headaches and frustration for many shop floors.

It doesn’t have to be that way.  An integral feature of paperless manufacturing is removing the unnecessary paper from the work traveler and leaving you with a format that makes sense for your shop process.

With Quantum or Interax and CIMx Software, each work order created is a separate file in the system.  Important details are part of the file, and easily accessible.  Work and set-up instructions, safety material, important training information and more are all attached to each work order, and can be accessed when and wherever necessary.  Most importantly, only the latest approved information can be accessed, and when needed change orders can be signaled through the system and made in just a few moments.  After all, there’s proof visual work instructions are far superior to paper-based ones.

From the shop floor, quality checks can be made and added directly to the work order, where it can be securely stored.  If there is a file or digital photo the shop floor wants to add to the file, it can be added with a press of a button.

From anywhere you have access to your network; you can track the progress of the paperless traveler with real-time information.  No more running to the shop floor asking questions, or flipping through pages to swap out flawed work instructions, or retroactive quality checks.  Sounds good, doesn’t it?

When the work order is complete, it is securely stored in a digital archive.  You can access the file at any time, and a complete as-built record is a single button press away.  Forget the stress of audits, everything that needs to be done is done automatically.  Want to run reports on the data to help optimize production?  No problem.

Eliminating unnecessary paper from your work travelers may not be your primary reason for implementing a paperless manufacturing system, but it may be what your shop floor is most thankful for when the project is complete.  Shop floors are quickly moving paperless, so now is the time to get a head start on the process and a leg up on the competition.

Feeding the Upgrade Need for Your MES or Paperless Manufacturing Software

Do you have a plan in place to capitalize on the latest technological breakthroughs for your shop floor?  If not, does your competition?

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

My brother has a new cell phone, and I have a case of tech-envy.

If you don't have a plan in place to upgrade your manufacturing software, how can you be sure your system isn't fading into obsolescence?  Image by www.colourbox.com

If you don’t have a plan in place to upgrade your manufacturing software, how can you be sure your system isn’t fading into obsolescence? Image by http://www.colourbox.com

With a faster processor, more memory and a better camera, he took the pictures everyone wanted at a birthday party this weekend.  He has access to more apps and new features he’s only now beginning to explore. My phone is 2+ years-old, and Evernote is just as likely to lock up as open, and for some reason I can’t get a signal in my kitchen, no matter what I do.

Unfortunately, tech-envy is fairly common today.  New technology comes out so quickly.  Innovation is a marketplace advantage.  Some will capitalize on the new innovations, and others (yeah, I’m looking at myself) struggle with legacy systems.

Manufacturers and the shop floor aren’t immune to tech-envy.  Many times, an older MES or process control system will constrain the work flow process, leaving manufacturers with a system costing more than the benefits accrued.  Because technology and processes advance so quickly, systems that aren’t upgraded sink into obsolescence.  The system you purchased to benefit production and save money is now stealing profit.

I’d love to upgrade my phone.  I recently came across a plan from T-Mobile that allows you to upgrade your phone after just six months.  With the “Jump” plan, when the latest technology comes out you can trade in the old phone for a new one.  I’m drooling at the thought of all that new, tasty technology goodness and the advantages it will give me over my brother. 

Technology is changing faster than ever before?  You can make technology a competitive advantage. Image  by www.colourbox.com

Technology is changing faster than ever before? You can make technology a competitive advantage. Image by http://www.colourbox.com

Just like cell phone users, many manufacturers are seeing the value in an upgrade.  In today’s technology market, with buzzy buzzwords like, “mobility” or “cloud,” or “big data” upgrades, especially inexpensive upgrades that minimize operational resource drain, can be the difference between a successful MES installation and another legacy system slowly dragging your shop floor down.  As you consider shop floor software, look at not only current functionality, but how upgrades will be managed.

Here are a few questions to ask and secrets to successfully selecting an MES and paperless manufacturing systems that will ensure the latest technology is a shop floor advantage to you with a customer-friendly upgrade plan:

  • Does the system use open, adaptable work flow process control architecture? A form-based system will limit your upgrade opportunities, increase the cost and work necessary, and potentially impose a new process with each upgrade (which can happen with some cloud-based systems).
  • How long will it take, and will there be a service charge?   Is a large team and additional service charges necessary for initial implementation?  The cost for initial implementation will give you an idea of the requirements for an upgrade.
  • Is there a cost and charge for an upgrade? To stay current and maximize your benefit and ROI, you’ll want to upgrade at least once a year, and upgrade costs will increase your Total Cost of Ownership (TCO).
  • How much “customization” does your system have?  Many times, custom software will increase the cost of an upgrade (every upgrade) and will limit your ability to benefit from new technology and processes.

The best software solutions maximize and manage production, and increase quality and profit not only now, but in the future.  Ensure a long-term solution for your shop floor by having an upgrade plan in place before installation.

Otherwise, you might be installing your next legacy software system, and in a few years you’ll be looking for a new solution or managing a shop floor that can’t find a signal in the kitchen.

Discovering the (Hidden) Benefits of Paperless Manufacturing

Many times, the greatest benefits of paperless manufacturing aren’t ones in your list of requirements.

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Our recently launched new website (have you seen it at www.cimx.com?) opened my eyes to how powerful an open, adaptable paperless manufacturing system can be.

We did extensive functionality and feature planning for our new website.  We looked at designs, determined the core audience and their needs, and studied how we use our CMS (Content Management System).   We were left with a massive, unwieldy list that we promptly whittled down to focus on our key needs.  In the end, it wasn’t a matter of sacrificing functionality, but realizing the massive list of requirements wasn’t the best way to meet our business needs or the real needs of visitors to the site.

Selecting an open, adaptable MES can yield hidden benefits you might never add to a list of requirements. Photo by www.colourbox.com

Selecting an open, adaptable MES can yield hidden benefits you might never add to a list of requirements. Photo by http://www.colourbox.com

Then the website launched and we started using it.  All the cool functionality on our initial list is there… like the ability to download PDF’s, a news stream, and our new blog (a VERY cool blog that this one will merge into), and more.  But, the feature I now love the most wasn’t even on our requirement list.

On the old site, I spent HOURS (many-many hours) uploading new material.   It involved formatting and loading text into forms, adding artwork, and creating links and menus.  In the past, I would schedule a day to load pages, and then time to make corrections.  Our CMS was custom-built, and I was making full use of the massive requirement list the CMS was based on.  I thought this pain was just the price of doing business on the website.

Once I got over my, “this is how we have to do it,” attitude, I quickly fell in love with the new system.  Today, loading a new page or article is something I can knock out quickly.  The system is open and easy-to-use, so I spend my time doing more productive work.  I miss nothing about the old method.

Stories like this are common in successful MES and paperless manufacturing implementations.  Sure, MES will give you process control, increase quality, drive profit, and give you shop floor visibility and real-time production information, but with the right system, you’ll discover other benefits. For example, we recently implemented a shop floor work instruction viewer for a customer.  They now collect shop floor data and have eliminated paper build books – HUGE benefits to the shop floor.  They are more productive and efficient.  But the ability to link a photo of a machine to the work instructions has become the shop floor’s favorite feature, and it wasn’t even on the list of requirements.  Turns out, since the shop floor worker has to use multiple machines, having that photo saves them a lot of effort and makes their job easier

The shop used a digital camera to take a picture of the machines.  An engineer added the photo to the work instructions.  The photo could have been a short video of machine set up or on-demand training as another company is doing.  It took 10 minutes of work, and now the entire shop floor is more productive, and management benefits from increased excitement for the new paperless manufacturing system.  It was an unplanned benefit of using such a robust and open paperless manufacturing or MES system.  The goal of the software should be making your business better, working with your processes, and not dictating how your processes need to work.  We know manufacturing and software, but we’re still excited to hear how customers discover new ways to benefit from our software.

Many manufacturers believe their only option is a custom-built paperless manufacturing system, or a system built internally.  They fool themselves into believing an 18-24 month design and implementation project is necessary.     Many custom-built or form-based manufacturing systems are rigid by necessity, many times driven by extensive requirement lists, and end up delivering less functionality than a more open, adaptable system.

Want to know more?   Do you have the ability to use your shop floor methods in new and unexpected ways that excite the staff?  Is your shop floor empowered to use their system to maximize opportunity and find a “better way”? Stop by our new website (www.cimx.com) and take a look at other new features we’re offering.  As always, we’re happy to answer any questions you have.

Deciphering the Role of MES

Understanding the difference between MES and ERP isn’t difficult once you understand the Human Element of manufacturing operations.

By Kristin McLane, President of CIMx Software

Defining MES is much easier when you understand the human element on the shop floor. Illustration from www.colourbox.com

Defining MES is much easier when you understand the human element on the shop floor. Illustration from http://www.colourbox.com

Trying to answer, “What is MES?” is not easy, and it’s a question I get a lot.  A good MES delivers smooth operations.  The information and process management available in true MES increases quality, eliminates scrap, and build products efficiently.  For each part of your operation, MES has a different meaning.  For the shop floor, it’s where they get work instructions and collect data.  For engineering, it’s how instructions are built and a tool for ECO (Engineering Change Orders).  For finance, it might be a line item, for sales and customer service it’s a way to track orders, and so on…

This is why I’ve begun connecting the role of MES to the human element in manufacturing.  Confused?  Here’s what I mean…

Most customers we talk to are confused about the boundaries between MES, ERP, scheduling and a host of other products driving the engine of their business.  In digital business tools, an ERP or MRP is focused on the business and finance of your business, while the MES focuses on people – helping them work better, smarter and faster. 

Your workplace is teeming with the human element right now.  Employees are designing, planning, building, testing and shipping your products every day.  If you’re in the services industry, your product is your people. 

The human element can be amazingly powerful and scary all at the same time.  Machines aren’t as creative as humans, but a machine can reliably repeat the exact same motion long after a human arm has tired.  Humans aren’t as durable as a shop floor machine, but when disaster strikes, I trust a human to think through the next steps.

Make your operation more efficient with MES and Paperless Manufacturing. Illustration by www.colourbox.com

Make your operation more efficient with MES and Paperless Manufacturing. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

Take a closer look at a manufacturing business.  Inside the business, you have HR, finance, customer support and other operational areas.  The central tool to manage these aspects of your business is the ERP software.  The ERP connects these areas, manages the information and provides a communication flow.  It is a big task, which is why ERP installations are typically long and complex, but should result in a well-running support system.   It is a transaction-based system. 

Let’s examine this further.  An order from the Acme Co. comes in for 10 green widgets due a week from Tuesday. The order is entered into the ERP which stores the information and notifies engineering and the shop floor of the order.  The ERP is very good at managing a transaction-based operation such as this.

In engineering another set of tools come into play.  Engineering uses CAD systems, drawing and specification tools, and spreadsheets to produce the documentation necessary for green widgets.  This includes detailed instructions for how to build the widget, any relevant measurements to be made during production to ensure the widget meets specifications, drawings, blueprints, photographs, safety sheets and all other files related to the part.  One useful tool you often find here is a PDM (product data management) system to organize engineering documents and ensure only the latest version of a document is available.   

An ERP manages transactions, and a PDM organizes documents, but neither creates the process-focused operation necessary to create a work package for the shop floor.  This is the human element we mentioned at the beginning that is the focus of an MES, helping manage human and operational elements on the shop floor to ensure you have the most efficient-built green widgets for the Acme Co., and Acme has the quality assurance and as-built records they need for their completed order.

Choices and options.

Deciphering MES isn’t about using acronyms, it’s about understanding the human element on the shop floor. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com.

Production control receives the order from the ERP and needs to match it with the documentation from engineering.  The MES completes this function, where the ERP cannot.  With just a PDM or an ERP, you end up contorting a transaction tool or document management system to twist a myriad of MS Word and Excel documents into a process, which leads to the poor humans on the shop floor reading and re-reading documents, trouble-shooting, searching for answers when they should be building.  Data collection gets lost in the ERP transactions or the PDM, if it is collected at all. 

MES adds the human element to your digital manufacturing tools.  You have widgets you need to build.  You have machines to do it.  MES tells the people what to do at each machine in order to build the widgets correctly.  Without it, the people on the shop floor have to make independent decisions based on disparate knowledge about production, or they rely on tribal knowledge that is never adequately collected.  Sometimes this works, but since there is no process control, you can’t guarantee it will work every time.  It’s an unreliable and very expensive way to manufacture. 

MES provides a toolkit connecting other business systems to manufacturing, ensuring your team produces to the highest quality tolerances and with the highest productivity.  Ultimately, it has the biggest direct impact of any system on the profit for the business.  In manufacturing, an MES is the basic building block upon which profit is built because it is focused on process-based manufacturing operations that drive the business.

When someone asks me what an MES is, I could recite a litany of acronyms, starting with ANSI/ISA-95 standards, toss in a PRM note and sprinkle in OEE or LEAN with a healthy dose of tech speak… or I could talk about the human element that is so critical for manufacturing success.  You don’t purchase an ERP to build a car, and you don’t hire machines to fix a problem.  You hire the best people for your shop floor and give them to the tools they need to succeed, and that’s where an MES comes in.