Five Steps to Eliminating Manufacturing Tech Debt and Optimizing Production

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Recently, we’ve seen manufacturers waiting to begin technology and manufacturing software projects.

Sure, they have no real-time production visibility. Error-prone quality control and production reports on departmental spreadsheets are common problems, but these companies think the process works (mostly).

They are accumulating manufacturing tech debt that will have to be paid soon. In the meantime, waiting is increasing production risk and cost to unsustainable levels.

What is Manufacturing Tech Debt?

Tech debt, a phrase we’ve discussed before, is a concept first proposed by Ward Cunningham, a computer programmer credited with creating the first internet wiki. In programming, you collect tech debt when you program quickly to get a job done fast, rather than completing work slowly and correctly. In Cunningham’s view, you’ll have to pay that tech debt in future development to fix that “quick” programming into better, more stable design.

Developers can program quickly in the beginning to meet critical deadlines, but as long as they continue fix the early design choices (and slowly pay off the tech debt) the project never flounders due to those early decisions.

Manufacturing tech debt works similarly. You can hold off correcting inefficiencies and production errors, but eventually you will have to pay your debt. Another homegrown computer system or departmental spreadsheet will keep production running, but it adds tech debt. Your critical data and processes are more inefficient, more disconnected, and the pressure on the shop floor to “make it work” even greater as you accumulate debt.

The cost of that debt is insidious. How much time and productivity is wasted searching for information on spreadsheets? How much scrap accumulates because the shop floor can’t find critical data during production? These costs quickly add up, growing your manufacturing tech debt. These homegrown solutions continue to silo and segment information in the company, and if the person who developed the solution ever leaves, that data may be lost forever.

As customer demands increase and the talent and labor pool shrinks, the cost of this debt will accelerate. It’s going to hammer many unsuspecting companies still clinging to spreadsheets and paper.

Increasing Efficiency by Paying Down your Manufacturing Tech Debt

Here’s the good news – paying off your manufacturing tech debt is easier than you think with modern tools and technology. Here are a few steps you should take as soon as possible:

  • Identify your key needs. What inefficiency or problem has the greatest impact on production?
  • Set an acceptable budget. Waiting is not an option. You don’t need a massive budget, but look at what you are wasting in time and production and set a reasonable budget for a solution.
  • Assign a team to the problem. If you assemble key stakeholders, including someone who can manage money and assemble executive resources, you’ll kick start a solution.
  • Select an area to test the solution. Many times, projects get bogged down with scope creep. Select a single area, or one old database, to update. Limit the initial project.
  • Do something! The only way pay down your manufacturing tech debt, improve efficiency, and eliminate the nagging problems holding back production is to take action.

Most, if not all, companies that invest in a project to eliminate their Manufacturing Tech Debt see an immediate return in increased efficiency, fewer errors, and increased productivity. Some companies report a 3 to 1 return on their investment in new manufacturing software within the first year.

What Comes Next for Improved Production

One mistake many manufacturers make is considering only their existing software as a potential solution. They already have an ERP, and will try to enhance the existing system to meet their needs.

The ERP was never designed with production in mind, and can’t adequately support manufacturing. The ERP is a transactional system, and is perfect for HR and finance functions. It was never meant to support the workflow and process work of the shop floor, no matter how many modules you add.

Manufacturing tech debt requires a manufacturing, specifically Paperless Manufacturing, solution.

Want to know more, or get a free evaluation of your shop floor with an Application Engineer, then contact CIMx today for a free shop floor analysis.

Bridging the Gap between Your PLM and Manufacturing

Manufacturing and engineering are both symbiotic and disjointed. While manufacturing relies on engineering to do their work, engineers are not trained to provide manufacturing exactly what they need at the design phase; that’s further downstream.

These key differences require a bridge between the PLM tools in engineering and production operations on the shop floor.

It All Starts in Design

Engineers create a long list of documents during product design to ensure a product meets the customer’s needs and can be manufactured with the available materials, tools, machinery and people. Different products require different levels of complexity, including drawings, specifications, designs, materials, measurements and other detailed lists of requirements. A Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) system keeps all the information organized for the engineer.

This diversity, however, makes it more difficult for manufacturing, where work moves quickly and there’s not a lot of time to read. The PLM that was so useful during design cannot break down the work into operator-sized information packets for the shop floor.

Manufacturing Pushes the Pace

Manufacturing operates at a much faster pace than engineering. The shop floor doesn’t have time to digest complex information before beginning production. Even in the most labor-intensive, discrete production environments, operators work at the fastest possible pace.

Operators don’t have time to search for information on a drawing or spec sheet. If it’s not on the screen when operators need it, productivity and profitability fall drastically. Even a few minutes spent searching can make the difference between a profitable production run and a project overrun.

Manufacturers need to manage the production process with speed and precision; design engineers need details that inherently slow that production down.

Where is the Bridge?

The bridge lies between design and manufacturing. Design and manufacturing get the specific tools they need to do their jobs – tools that are significantly different.

  • PLM design is absolutely required in most modern, complex manufacturing settings. Complete control of engineering design increases competitiveness of the resulting product.
  • Engineering design for complex manufacturing can’t be done by the transactional ERP.
  • Current PLM product offerings meant to work in manufacturing require far too many interactions by the operators to be effective.
  • Companies need bi-directional data transfer between design and manufacturing. Production should provide valuable feedback to design.
  • Traditional MES systems (used on manufacturing shop floors) struggle to get information back to the PLM.

A Solution for Both Manufacturing and Design

Without the proper design, production can’t build correctly and without the detailed instructions, production can’t do its work. There is no sacrifice here that will work. As engineering information flows to the shop floor already, this part of the equation is complete. What’s missing is the critical link for manufacturing back to design and manufacturing engineering (there are holes in both areas traditionally).

What Can Help?

ERP systems can’t. These are transactional systems that will force the design and manufacturing engineers to separate every production step or list them as a single step without the associated, “nested” details that are so critical to the operators.

PLM systems can’t. We’ve already seen how these systems manage documents, but not the associated instructions. Operators can’t build from the documents, as they don’t have the time or experience, typically, to differentiate what specific work needs to be done at each step.

This leaves just the MES and even at that, most MES systems won’t touch the PLM without extensive programming and customization. Manufacturers also need process enforcement, work center or operator-based work instructions, quality control and access to all the PLM documentation that’s required to do the job.

Recently, we introduced a product platform that makes live communication between the PLM and the MES a reality, without the requirement for customization. While we understand many of the problems facing manufacturers, digging into this problem, we’ve found that we have only scratched the surface. Plenty of additional problems exist in connecting systems in the manufacturing environment. What other issues do you have? We’re interested to know.

Our goal is to break down the walls between engineering, design and the shop floor. That is where we see the real power of the Smart Factory or Manufacturing 2.0. Visit us online at www.CIMx.com and let us know what your biggest challenges are.

The Future of Wire and Cable Harness Manufacturing

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Every year, wire and cable harness manufacturers and suppliers descend on the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee for the Electrical Wire Processing Technology Expo. I’d heard from both customers and industry experts this was the show to be at.

With so much to see and do in Milwaukee, it’s taken me a few days to process it all. What can a new attendee learn? As an industry, where do we go from here?

Here are my key takeaways from the 2017 EWPTE show:

  • The Promise and Limits of Automation: Many suppliers offered tools to control machines and automate wire harness processes. Automation will eliminate errors and reduce costs, but these strategies offer diminishing returns. Automating a single machine or process limits benefit. How many companies use the same machines across their shop, or utilize the same process for every product or lot? Automation offers tremendous benefits, but it’s not ready to revolutionize the industry. Versatility and real-time flexibility are trending toward the top of the industry.
  • Strategic Optimization for Manufacturing: Manufacturers are continually looking for ways to optimize processes and improve results. It wouldn’t be a manufacturing show without a focus on optimization, and 2017 EWPTE didn’t disappoint. Seminars offered optimization strategies for a variety of wire harness applications, or monitoring and data collection tools to better manage machine efficiency. Machine and tool optimization is only one piece of an optimization strategy. Connecting operators with their machinery using advanced analytics and visual work instruction completes the puzzle.
  • A Focus on Employee Productivity: Wire harness manufacturing is fundamentally a manual process. Increasing production and maintaining a competitive advantage requires more than new machines. It requires an investment in employees. Suppliers are responding with new products, including tools to lay out wire harness design using augmented reality and active feedback loops on the shop floor to increase production. Paperless Manufacturing systems proactively manage production, helping employees focus on value-added work among other capabilities in the software.
  • The Next Big Thing in Wire Harness Manufacturing: In the past, outside technologies and influences have pushed wire harness forward. At the show, many attendees wondered where the, “next big thing” in wire harness might come from. The pressure is on the industry, and companies need to adapt or OEM and Tier 1 manufacturers will find a wire harness supplier that will. Wire harness companies need to roll out new products faster, shorten the lead time on orders, and deliver more accurate bids and estimates. Companies must deliver more value to succeed in a competitive market.

With so much pressure on wire harness manufacturers, many companies might turn to a single investment, a fancy crimping tool or testing machine, as their sole solution.

A real solution requires more than a single machine. It requires an evaluation of your manufacturing processes to identify the issues holding back production and the business. Are you collecting and using your production and labor data? How are you managing scheduling? What factors influence your production lead time?

After listening to industry experts during webinars, and talking with the manufacturers and suppliers at the show, it was reaffirmed that companies recognize dated methods of managing production no longer deliver the results necessary to succeed. Wire harness companies know best-guess estimates and pencil-whipped production records won’t deliver a competitive advantage.

After my first year attending EWPTE, I can see the rumblings of change in our industry. I can’t wait to see where we go from here. Want to learn more about Paperless Manufacturing and how real-time production data and finite scheduling can benefit your company? Contact CIMx for a free demo of our software for wire harness manufacturing today.

Simple Steps to Improve Production Quality

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications with CIMx Software

Every manufacturer struggles to improve quality during production.  Any level of defect is unacceptable, causing scrap, rework, missed ship dates, and lost profit.  Quality defects can cause a host of other problems more difficult to measure; including customer’s losing confidence in your product and frustration on the operations team.

While you may have a team working hard to improve quality assurance and quality control, manufacturers must be judicious in pursuing increased quality.  With any quality program, there are diminishing returns for the initiatives.  Adding more people to Quality Control, or creating additional checklists for production, will not always bring an acceptable return.

However, there are simple steps you can take to bring sustainable improvements in quality and provide a solid foundation for future initiatives.

A Closer Look at Manufacturing Quality

There are two distinct aspects to production quality.

Confidence Button Shows Assurance Belief And Boldness

Continuous sustainable quality improvement is only possible with a digital system. Illustration by www,colourbox.com

Quality assurance is usually defined as the management of the quality of parts, materials, tools, production engineering plans, production processes and all aspects of the work flow.  Quality assurance focuses on the proactive preparation for the release of orders, eliminating common sources of errors by guaranteeing inventory and tooling is available and creating of easily understood production instructions.  These are two critical elements to support an efficient production process.

The other aspect of production quality is Quality Control, commonly defined as the data collection measurements and inspections made during production to ensure products meet or exceeds specifications.  Quality control requires accurate measurements be taken during production, and a record made of all metrics in the engineering specifications.  By identifying and eliminating defects early, before they become more serious and costly, overall workflow and production performance is improved.

Simple Steps to Improve Production Quality

Manufacturers using paper to manage quality and production are creating an environment with a high risk of quality defects.  Paper simply cannot adequately support modern manufacturing, especially not as a tool in Quality Assurance and Quality Control.  Companies relying on paper will see limited improvement in manufacturing quality, but larger gains are impossible due to the fundamental flaws of using paper to manage production.  Build books filled with brief instructions and difficult-to-understand steps printed off a few hours earlier, and quality measurements hastily scribbled on sheets of paper do nothing to control or manage quality.

Continuous sustainable quality improvement starts by eliminating paper from the production process and transitioning to Paperless Manufacturing.  Consider these simple steps:

  • Convert the paper environment to a digital environment.

There’s no need to recreate your work instructions.  Move your existing, corrected instructions to a digital format that can quickly be accessed by engineering as they are planning.  The shop floor benefits with revision controlled, accurate work instructions and multimedia production assistance when needed.

  • Integrate production information from inventory management to shipping.

Incorporate all production documents and data in common records that can be accessed when and where they are needed.  Eliminate the struggle production has in finding information when they need it, by linking relevant data to each operation.

  • Use digital methods to assure and control quality at every step.

Automatically collect data and ensure specifications are met. Shorten the time a defect is identified and corrected with automatic tolerance and a closed loop disposition system.  Create proactive alerts for inventory shortage, machine issues, or bottlenecks.

Companies that have embraced paperless manufacturing have seen their production quality increase, often dramatically, by using readily-available technology to aid, manage and control the materials and process steps of the work flow.  Automating the process of collecting metrics and responding to defects at the point of occurrence isn’t difficult, and will improve quality and profitability.  Unlike systems that only target specific areas of the manufacturing value chain, paperless manufacturing provides a solid foundation to improving both Quality Assurance and Quality Control across the production workflow.

Contact CIMx Software to see how Paperless Manufacturing can improve quality for you.

Tips to Stay Focused on Production Improvement in 2017

By Liz Hamedi, Customer Experience Specialist with CIMx Software

Every New Year there is a behavior cycle that begins among manufacturers and manufacturing software providers.

Manufacturers reach out to software and solution providers at the beginning of the year to solve their production problems and eliminate the frustrations.  Problems are holding their business and production back.  It’s a New Year and time for a new start, they tell us, and the company is motivated to get something done.

As the year goes on, they lose focus and start making excuses.  The project is too big, or not what they expected or some other problem took precedence.  By the end of the year, they end up right where they were the previous year, and the cycle begins again.

The solution, and improved production, is closer than these companies realize. For 2017, our goal is to deliver solutions that help manufacturers and improve efficiency.  From our experience, there are three reasons companies wait on a manufacturing software solution: money, risk and fear.

Eliminating Manufacturing Software Indecision

Money is a concern for every business.  Many software projects fail because the team focuses on the price tag and cost rather than the ROI.  Years ago, when all software solutions were exorbitantly priced and complex, the ROI was measured in years.  Today, with the advent of modern software technology, a powerful off-the-shelf software solution will deliver an ROI in less than 9 months.  Start your project by considering what the problems you want to solve cost the business.  Look for a system that will solve problems and fit your budget. Look at the value beyond the initial price tag and consider the ROI. Software won’t only solve problems, but accumulate value.

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Want to improve production? Stay focused on proactive improvements, rather than reactive solutions. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

Risk keeps many projects from ever starting, even when there is a compelling need for a solution. Many Manufacturers recognize change is needed, but without a guaranteed benefit they hesitate.  In their mind, a software solution is a factor they can’t adequately anticipate, and a failed project can negatively impact the whole business.  Today, there are steps a company can take to minimize risk.  Start with a pilot program.  Test the software in a single area or production line before rolling it out to the whole plant.  Look for software that supports an agile phased implementation, helping minimize disruption and allowing for greater control of the implementation process.

Fear motivates many manufacturers to find excuses rather than solve problems. Many fear the software solution will be worse than their current situation.  They fear the impact on the company and co-workers.  They fear the resource cost – IT is already overworked and understaffed, and there is no way they can possibly support another system.  There may be other problems, such as outdated planning or an existing software system that may be difficult to integrate, causing hesitation.  Identify these fears early in the process and engage the software supplier in a solution. Often through open dialogue you will discover the solution is much easier than you think.

A Promise for Improved Production

Make 2017 the year you eliminate errors and modernize your manufacturing operations.  At CIMx, we’re here to walk with you every step of the way.  For many, the first step is the hardest, but once you identify a solution, the benefit will greatly exceed the cost.

Reach out to CIMx today and discover how we can solve your production problems and deliver benefits and results in 2017.

Manufacturing Software and Paperless Manufacturing in 2017

By Kristin McLane, President of CIMx Software

We regularly review the manufacturing software market.  Last year, we were twice caught off-guard by references to the “death of Manufacturing Execution Software” (MES) by both a major analyst firm and a competitor.

Manufacturing software isn’t dying.  With the changes to our industry, the growth of technology, and the need for companies to better manage resources and production, there has never been more need for strong software tools to support production.  Paper, a modified spreadsheet, or an ERP modified with some shop floor functionality, simply can’t provide the capability manufacturers need.  There is no magic bullet, super-system to solve all your enterprise problems and replace manufacturing software.  Predicting the “death of MES” flies directly in the face of what we see every day.

The Premature Demise of Manufacturing Software

In the first case, an analyst predicted MES vendors would need to specialize to survive the next 5 – 10 years.  I agreed whole-heartedly with this analysis; manufacturing systems do need to adapt.  The era of the 200+ MES vendors that do it all is over.  Technology is so prevalent with apps and devices everywhere, there’s no way a general, “everything to everybody” system can thrive. His solution, however, was an incredibly and wildly expensive master system that utilized every hot button technology analysts obsess over.

When I read similar content from a competitor, I thought back to the analyst’s prediction.  The thing they had in common, however, wasn’t the prognostication.  It was their blindness to more than 90 percent of the manufacturing market – firms that don’t make the Fortune 50.  Each was looking at the market of multi-million dollar software implementations with automation, IIoT and BA that only the fewest manufacturing companies can consider.

Process Improvement graph.

Take steps to improve production and profit with Paperless Manufacturing in 2017. Illustration by http://www.colourbox.com

 

This doesn’t mean MES is dying.  Manufacturing software for the rest of the industry is adapting, better utilizing technology to improve both functionality and efficiency.

Years ago, we started talking about Paperless Manufacturing as a focus long before others picked it up. We wanted to empower manufacturers to improve productivity and quality, eliminating compliance issues by eliminating error-prone and inefficient paper on the shop floor with a system and software tools that are easy-to-use and quick to implement out of the box.  Now everyone seems to be talking about paperless manufacturing (which isn’t another way of saying MES is dying).

Many analysts and major software providers focus on only the very largest manufacturers in the world, completely ignoring the largest segment of the market.  They both offer solutions for only the largest companies. Their position makes sense for those companies, but I struggle when they use that perspective to move the needle without considering the entire market.  It’s no wonder a majority of manufacturers struggle to find software designed for them, or believe manufacturing software is going to bankrupt their business.

Manufacturing Software Solutions for the Market

I don’t understand these analysts and massive software providers refusal to see the manufacturing world below $1 billion.  For these companies, there is no Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), no Smart Connected Assets, no Factory-Automated shop floor in the works.  These hard-working manufacturers need immediate, focused and sustainable help to survive the current challenges of global competition, worker shortages and a lack of interest among new workers for manufacturing.  Predictive analytics is fun to read about, but it’s not going to get the next order out the door.

The good news is there are systems and software solutions designed for these companies. With modern technology, there’s no reason why all manufacturers can’t support their production operations with software.  The right system can save money, improve production and quality, and get orders out the door.  Manufacturers and a production operations team shouldn’t have to struggle with inefficiency.

There are even software systems that can be installed and help improve production and efficiency this year (not all can, so be sure to understand the service and ask for qualifications and guarantees).  The law of averages tells me that for every US $10 million in revenue you have on the top line, you can conservatively spend between US $35,000 and $50,000 on a system.  That’s more than enough to move from inefficient paper to paperless manufacturing and all the benefits it brings.

You will need to create a short, focused list of requirements; some vendors can even help you with that.  Here are a few things to watch out for as you start researching the market:

  • Template-based systems (fill in the boxes or blanks) work well only for those companies that have consistent, never-failing production. These are useful in automated settings where input is minimal and variation is seldom.
  • Services-to-install are an area that some vendors will underbid on. Ask for a fixed-bid to complete the work, a guarantee of deliverables and make sure the vendor offers a very strong complaint process.
  • Upgrades must be included in annual support. Always buy the annual support to ensure you can upgrade.  New functionality will keep your production operations modern and focused.
  • Be knowledgeable about the vendor’s support practices before you sign on the dotted line. Ask how they support customers and call the support line before you purchase to see how you are treated.  Their handling of issues will be fairly consistent throughout your tenure with them.

Make 2017 the year you start doing something to improve your competitiveness, profitability and quality.

If you don’t know how to take the first steps, reach out to us at CIMx Software.  Our goal is to provide our manufacturing software to as many companies with a real need as we can, and we’re offering programs right now that can immediately accelerate your research and get you started.  We can help you assess your needs with a Shop Floor Analysis, a market review and other helpful tools.

Want to know more? Contact CIMx today, we’re happy to help.

2016 Year in Review for Manufacturing Technology

By David Oeters, Corporate Communications for CIMx Software

At first glance, 2016 was a year of promise linking production priorities with emergent technologies.  Speculation was rampant with industry buzzwords flying fast and furious – Smart Manufacturing, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), the Digital Thread, Data Mining, Cloud technology.

What is lost in the speculation of 2016 is the technical and industry hurdles we need to overcome before the speculation becomes a practical reality for our industry. Consider this:

  • The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) will use machine sensors and automation to better manage production processes, identifying and eliminating problems before they happen…once we determine the format and infrastructure of the IIoT, significantly lower the cost of integration, and agree on how security will be managed.

  • Cloud-based apps offer companies the chance to reduce capital and infrastructure expenses and manage software remotely…as long as they relinquish control of their data and apps to the service providers and accept increased costs and potential downtime.

  • Smart Manufacturing heralds the convergence of Information Technology (IT) and Operations Technology (OT)…so Production Managers with enough time, resources, and a willing and able IT resource to implement and support smart, connected devices can improve production outcomes.

  • Manufacturing customers see the promise of collaborative manufacturing and customization, and are expecting more from manufacturers, and manufacturers are using 3D printing and digital PLM tools to provide flexibility not found in traditional manufacturing processes…hoping they can maintain margins while frantically searching for new value streams to improve profits.

A Dose of Manufacturing Truth

As exciting as it was to speculate on the future in 2016, we’ve ignored the current manufacturing truth faced by many companies. Businesses don’t need speculation, they need practical solutions.  According to a study by Adobe, 82% of the companies still rely heavily on paper.  Four out of five businesses say they are trying to use less paper, but a third of the companies actually used MORE paper.  These companies aren’t thinking about the Digital Thread, they wonder how they can continue supporting their business.

An operations team struggling to manage massive paper build books and unsure how to access the latest revision of production plans isn’t considering smart-connected machines.  A company with a single, overworked IT resource isn’t ready for a Smart Manufacturing strategy.  A shop floor supervisor struggling to identify shipping dates and manage production schedules isn’t thinking about IIoT.

The solutions our industry is focused on and the suppliers offering them are still years, perhaps even decades, from providing a viable application for most manufacturers.  For example, an IIoT solution will require new machines, sensors to integrate with a shared database, a common machine language for all those sensors, a tool for mining the information for actionable data, and a method of automating the process. Currently, it’s expensive, with only limited applications.

The largest companies, with the money, resources and time to devote to speculation, are exploring the options and opportunities. Often, the goal is to monetize the technology and offer it on the market as a product or module for an existing application. The company hasn’t even worked out how to use it in their own processes.

Where We Were in 2016

Rather than speculate, I’d like to take an honest look at 2016.  Let’s see where our industry is now, rather than 10+ years from now.

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How are you using technology in production and operations? Illustration from http://www.colourbox.com

We’ve come across companies that have implemented an MES, or have stitched together different applications to remove paper from their processes and better manage and record manufacturing digitally.  Today, these companies are working to improve their processes, optimize production, and further support the manufacturing value chain.

The push to further optimize can lead to additional risks.  Companies are working toward integrating their software systems, such as ERP, PLM and ERP, through a single system.  Most of these projects have run into trouble, as the complexity of the integrated software slows, rather than supports, enterprise processes.  Brian Carpizo, a Team Lead with Uptake, an IIoT company in Chicago, described the problem in an article in Forbes as “… the converged IT/OT world does not lend itself to one-vendor systems of record or some kind of mega-ERP. The problem is just too complex.”

CIMx regularly works with companies struggling with inefficient, legacy software systems that should have been retired years ago.  These companies purchased manufacturing software during the advent of MES in the early 1990s; some built their own systems using Microsoft Access or other computer software. These early systems used custom code, making it expensive and difficult to upgrade.

Today, companies still using that old software pour more money and resources into maintaining the inefficient status quo, a logic fallacy known as a “sunk cost” that blinds businesses to the opportunity for improvement. Continuing to wait leads the company further into Technology Debt.  These companies are looking for a smooth transition to a new system.

Finally, there are a significant number of manufacturers still clinging to traditional, error-prone paper-based manufacturing. From our experience, whatever the reason for waiting each year to implement even a simple software system to better manage production operations, the company falls further and further behind their competition. Often, management doesn’t realize how easy and inexpensive a possible software solution is to implement.

A Bridge Forward in 2017

I’m not arguing against Smart Connected devices and technology. Technology will have a positive impact on manufacturing, now and in the future.  Automation and the IIoT are promising, and there are companies leveraging the Cloud to improve current business outcomes.

But to focus on technology still years away from practical application while ignoring the struggles of the majority of the industry in 2016 isn’t really putting your audience’s interests first.  We’re excited by the opportunity new technology offers, and we’re looking at ways to best utilize it in our product offerings, but in no way was this reflective of the work done in 2016, or the status of manufacturing last year.

A review of the year should focus on the business, and not the future.  There are tools out there now to help businesses still relying on paper and inefficient technology.

Next week, we’ll take a close look at what you can do in 2017 to deliver a positive impact on your business.